Report Card: Georgetown Prof Blasts Whites, Men, Police… but Vandalized School Models Mercy

Georgetown law prof: “white people are racist,” “men are sexist,” and he “hates cops”

Professor Preston Mitchum of Georgetown University Law school said online that “all white people are racist” and “all men are sexist,” according to Campus Reform.

“Yes, ALL white people are racist. Yes, ALL men are sexist. Yes, ALL cis people are transphobic,” professor Preston Mitchum tweeted, saying “we have to unpack that. That’s the work.”

He clarified that “the work” means “unlearning.”

Yes. That’s a fine motto for Georgetown. The University that unlearns your children.

He also recently reportedly said, “I really, really, really, really, really, really hate cops. Hate them. The power. The unfettered abuse. The narcissism. Hate hate them.”

Currently, the cost of attending Georgetown is $69,923.

Catholic school prays for vandals

Following a break-in and vandalization of Sacred Heart School in Reedsburg, Wisc., that caused thousands of dollars in damage, the administrators of the school say they are praying for the vandals.

Principal Karen Marklein called 911 immediately after discovering the damage, which included broken windows and computers. “You just have to know that it could be worse and, like I said, we’re going to move forward because we have to get ready for the school year,” she said, adding that the break-in is a teachable moment for their students.

“We just don’t know why they really did it, but whatever the reason, we need to pray for them, and hopefully the right person or persons who did this will maybe come forward,” she said.

Catholic school creates program for students with disabilities

Mount St. Mary’s High School in Oklahoma City is implementing a new program for students with disabilities, according to The Oklahoman.

Principal Talita DeNegri said she didn’t like having to say no to parents of students with disabilities. “They were coming from the Catholic grade schools, and we just did not have the means at the high school level to provide what their children needed,” she said.

The Cornerstone Inclusion Program, which has one enrollee this year so far, will integrate students with disabilities into as much of the typical high school environment as possible. Students will be paired with “buddies” from the school in an effort to aid their assimilation.

“Our responsibility as a Mount family is to embrace because I guarantee you, we are the ones who will be mostly touched and changed forever because of our Cornerstone Inclusion students,” she said. “It’s a proud moment for us.”

Raising up the Faith down under

The dean of the law school at the University of Notre Dame in Australia, Michael Quinlan, recently described Australia’s first Catholic university as, “unapologetically Catholic in all that we do,” according to the National Catholic Register.

The heart of the school’s education is the Logos program: a series of classes in the areas of philosophy, theology and ethics that all undergraduate students, regardless of major, are required to take.

Christian Brugger, dean of the School of Philosophy and Theology in Sydney, said the university offers many seminars by the School of Theology and Philosophy on subjects such as “relativism, seven deadly sins, technology, deep ecology and the ‘Four Last Things,’ just to name a few.”

Caution: notwithstanding our great respect for Brugger’s work, The Cardinal Newman Society has been told by Australian Catholics that the nation’s Notre Dame is not quite so vibrantly Catholic—especially in disciplines outside theology and philosophy—as the Register was told, and the university is not (yet) recommended in The Newman Guide… although Australia’s Campion College is.

Still, would that more Catholic schools were so eager to assert a strong Catholic identity!

Priest runs for students at Franciscan University

“God made me fast. And when I run, I feel His pleasure.”

That’s from Eric Liddell, the Christian runner featured in the famous classic movie Chariots of Fire, but I think the same can be said for Father Gregory Plow, TOR, of Franciscan University. He is running (very) long distance races to raise money for the faithful college’s neediest students, some of whom have either one or both parents not in their lives, as reported by epicPew.

On July 29, he ran the 50-mile Burning River Ultra-Marathon in Cuyahoga National Park to raise money for the Spirit of St. Francis Scholarship to help students. So far, two students have benefited from the tuition assistance.

Fr. Plow was joined by Franciscan University alumni, teachers and coaches, including biology professor Dr. Dan Kuebler and theology professor Dr. Alan Schreck, in running the 100-mile relay.

Cardinal Tobin may testify in defense of Catholic school expulsion

A court hearing has begun concerning a Catholic school’s decision to expel a young girl after her father sued the school to have his daughter placed on the boys’ basketball team, a suit they won despite Catholic teaching on gender differences.

St. Theresa’s School in Kenilworth refused to allow the family to register their two daughters this fall, claiming they’d upset the school community. The family is now asking for a court order ordering the school to allow them to register, reports nj.com.

Cardinal Joseph W. Tobin, the Archbishop of Newark, is expected to testify.

Catholic school makes millions with Snapchat investment

This is a problem every high school should have.

A $15,000 investment by Saint Francis High School five years ago turned into $34 million this year when the parent company of Snapchat went public.

Now the president of the school, Simon Chiu, wants to be very careful with how the money is utilized. Options under consideration include a new chapel, increased student aid, and teacher pay.

“We are blessed,” Mr. Chiu said. “But we don’t want to become a cautionary tale.”

Why Poe liked Fordham’s Jesuits

According to an article in Aleteia, famous author Edgar Allen Poe never converted to Catholicism despite associating frequently with the Jesuits at Fordham University.

He liked them, wrote a friend, because they were “highly cultivated gentlemen and scholars, they smoked and they drank and they played cards, and they never said a word about religion.”

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